The "Save Buddy" Legal Fund

For: Buddy, the Golden Retriever mix
Organizer: Advocates for San Antonio Pets (ASAP)
$6,162
of $5,000 goal
100% Complete
This fundraiser is closed. Thank you for your support!

The Story

A 6-year-old Golden Retriever mix named Buddy has been unjustly sentenced to death by Judge Daniel Guerrero of Municipal Court No. 4 despite a complete lack of evidence that he caused “serious” injuries” (as required by law). The dog, who is the constant loyal companion of an 83-year-old man, has no history of aggression and is known and loved by many as a sweet, well-trained dog.

Both Buddy’s owner and the 9-year-old alleged victim’s mother were within 2-3 feet of the girl and Buddy – yet BOTH testified at the hearing that they did not actually see Buddy bite the girl. Although the evidence at the hearing showed that Buddy may have jumped up and scratched a 9-year-old girl (whose mother was not preventing her from yelling in Buddy’s face), her injuries could not be shown to be serious or permanent. The law requires serious ripping and tearing of muscle to allow the judge to euthanize a dog. However, Judge Guerrero refused to allow Buddy’s owners to have the victim’s “injuries” examined by an independent medical examiner, refused to allow a dog behavior assessment and dog bite analysis to be done, and refused to allow for a jury trial.

While we feel for the girl, she has made a full recovery. Even her father admitted on the evening news that she had made a full physical recovery only a month after the incident. Buddy should not have to pay for this with his life.

Buddy’s attorney, Michelle Maloney, has obtained a Temporary Restraining Order giving Buddy a stay of execution pending exhaustion of all appellate remedies. In the meantime,  boarding fees of $30/day are mounting up at San Antonio’s Animal Care Services as Buddy has been held there since Nov 1, 2013 (and not allowed visitation by his family). Legal expenses are also accruing.

Please also sign the petition to District Court Judge Tina Torres, City Attorney Robbie Greenblum, and Mayor Castro to STOP THIS INJUSTICE!
http://www.thepetitionsite.com/994/190/295/san-antonio-dont-execute-buddy-the-dog-he-only-has-3-days-hurry/

If you can help Buddy obtain justice and also help his family continue their fight to keep Buddy alive, please make a donation however large or small.

(Unless otherwise instructed by the donor, should donations exceed actual costs, any excess will be used for the next dog in need of justice.)

Buddy and his family thank you!

Media coverage of Buddy's hearing on Nov 18, 2013:

http://www.expressnews.com/news/news_columnists/gilbert_garcia/article/Due-process-a-casualty-in-Buddy-the-Dog-hearing-5059999.php?t=265719191c510e9f4a

http://news4sanantonio.com/news/features/top-stories/stories/buddy-dog-gets-14-day-stay-execution-6498.shtml

Fundraiser Updates

Posted on January 25, 2014 by Advocates for San Antonio Pets (ASAP)
http://www.kens5.com/news/City-of-San-Antonio-releases-Buddy-the-Dog-to-his-owners-241974571.html

City of San Antonio releases 'Buddy the Dog' to his owners

Credit: Buddy's owners

by Andrew Delgado / KENS 5

Bio | Email | Follow: @ErandeTX

Posted on January 25, 2014 at 2:55 PM

Updated today at 8:19 PM

 

 SAN ANTONIO -- Local activists and pet lovers have something to celebrate this weekend: 'Buddy the Dog' is back in the loving arms of his owners.

Buddy was released Saturday morning from a veterinarian who had been caring for the dog since Jan. 16, when a judge ordered Buddy to be released from Animal Care Services.

The Golden-Retriever mix and his owners, Homer and Kathryn Mojica, will not return to their apartment, however -- the same apartment complex where Buddy allegedly attacked a 9-year-old girl last year. Instead, the elderly couple and their pooch are staying with someone in a private home that was approved by ACS while they search for a new residence.

Under the settlement that was reached between Buddy's owners and the city, the Mojicas must move to another home -- just one of several restrictions placed on Buddy via the agreement with the city.

Michelle Maloney, who legally represented the Mojicas, said Buddy's new address would not be disclosed to the public, in order to protect the privacy of his owners. Maloney said the couple fears retaliation and would like nothing more than to move forward.

Updated photos of Buddy are expected to be released soon.


Posted on January 24, 2014 by Advocates for San Antonio Pets (ASAP)
http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local/article/Buddy-the-Dog-free-to-reunite-with-owner-5173534.php

Buddy the Dog free to reunite with owner

By Vincent T. Davis, San Antonio Express-News : January 24, 2014

SAN ANTONIO — Buddy the Dog's long wait to be reunited with his owner is just about over.

About 6:30 p.m. Friday, Animal Care Services spokeswoman Lisa Norwood said the agency completed an inspection of the dog owner's new home and it successfully met all of the requirements of the agreement to release the 6-year-old golden retriever mix.

Buddy and Homer Mojica, his 83-year-old owner, have been apart since early November, when Judge Daniel Guerrero ordered the dog's euthanization for attacking a 9-year-old girl at a Northwest Side apartment complex in November.

Mojica said the dog was startled by the little girl when she screamed at him. But the girls' parents say the attack was unprovoked and required stitches and surgery to her face.

Last week, after weeks of negotiations between Mojica's attorney, Michelle Maloney, and city officials, the city agreed to release Buddy to the custody of Mojica's veterinarian until the last details of his release were finalized.

ACS is not releasing the new location to where the canine will be released.

“The terms of the settlement necessary for the release of Buddy were successfully abided by,” Norwood said.

But it was unclear Friday night if Buddy and his owner had already been reunited.

“It is our understanding they have free access to Buddy,” Norwood said.

The saga of Buddy the Dog comes to a close after days of supporters questioning why the canine hadn't already been released to his owner.

While negotiations were underway, more than 6,000 people signed an online petition for the dog's release. Supporters held a “Send Buddy Home,” rally Saturday at Alamo Plaza, seeking a change to the state law of “serious bodily injury,” and language, which allows dogs to be euthanized if they cause an injury resulting in severe bite wounds or severe ripping and tearing of muscle.

The girl's parents said their daughter suffered a torn eye duct, a gash on her cheek and a cut on the corner of her lip. They said she received 100 stitches to her cuts and a tear duct had to be mended during an hour and a half surgery.

As Mojica's attorney and city officials worked on the agreement, Mayor Julián Castro said “he believed an agreement could be reached that would allow Buddy to live.”

Even after the city backed down on their plans to euthanize them, it's taken almost a week to actually release him.

In an email on Thursday, animal activist John Bachman said ACS has been reminded of a paragraph that states the city agreed to release Buddy upon signature of the agreement.

“It seems apparent that the city, at least Animal Care Services and the city attorney's office cannot be relied on to act in good faith in this matter,” Bachman said. “This is not some contest and should not be treated as such.”

Norwood said they were waiting for the owner to meet the requirements of the agreement, which would address keeping the public safe from possible future incidents. Once all terms of the settlement were met, she said, ACS would release Buddy.

Norwood said the sticking point was where Buddy's owner new home would be. Supporters said management at Mojica's old apartment complex notified him that Buddy would not be allowed to return to the property.

“It's our understanding that the Mojicas' are in the process of looking to relocate, so once they do so, we'd be happy to schedule an inspection for them,” Norwood said, before Buddy's release. “We can come to their apartment, duplex or house, whatever the case may be. We want to do an inspection of the location to ensure not only that the location is secure, but to again make sure there's not going to be future events.”

Norwood said the agreement detailed several restrictions to be completed before Buddy could be released back to Mojica. Terms of the settlement for Mojica and his wife, Kathryn included: Buddy being kept in a secure enclosure when not on a leash, muzzled when outdoors and kept on a leash no longer than 6 feet when in public. As Buddy's owners, the Mojicas will have to keep liability insurance of $100,000 as long as he's their dog.

vtdavis@express-news.net


Posted on January 17, 2014 by Advocates for San Antonio Pets (ASAP)
http://www.kens5.com/news/Buddy-the-dog-to-be-returned-to-240635231.html

Buddy the dog released to veterinarian

by Kens5.com

Posted on January 16, 2014 at 4:57 PM

 

SAN ANTONIO --  Buddy the dog has been released to a veterinarian. 

The dog had been in Animal Care Services since November after a girl said the dog attacked her at a local apartment. 

A judge ruled in December the dog should be euthanized. 

Lawyers for Buddy's owners filed a temporary restraining order while an appeal on the decision is pursued. 

The dog was released to a veterinarian and the city said it will continue to discuss a possible resolution with the owner of the dog. 

The city also said the move is to ensure public safety pending an appeal by the dog's owner.


Posted on January 17, 2014 by Advocates for San Antonio Pets (ASAP)
http://www.ksat.com/news/buddy-the-dog-finds-new-home-for-appeals/-/478452/23968146/-/13bwxf0z/-/index.html

Buddy the dog finds new home during appeals

A vet will care for Buddy while owners appeal

Author: Robert Taylor, Web Editor
Published On: Jan 16 2014 05:04:25 PM CST   Updated On: Jan 16 2014 07:01:07 PM CST

Buddy the dog finds new home during appeals

SAN ANTONIO -

Buddy the dog will be in the care of a vet while his owners go through the appeals process.

The animal was saved from euthanization after the dog's owner got a restraining order.

Now, the city says the dog will remain in the care of a vet while the owners go through the appeals process.

An attorney for 83-year-old Homer Mojica announced last week that they had reached an agreement with the city that the dog would not be euthanized until all of their appeals had been exhausted.

A judge had ordered that Buddy be euthanized for biting a girl.

The Mojicas say it was just a scratch.

The city Thursday said the dog will be turned over to a vet in order to assure public safety.

  • Copyright 2014 by KSAT.com All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Posted on January 17, 2014 by Advocates for San Antonio Pets (ASAP)
http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local/article/Buddy-the-Dog-released-5150121.php?fb_action_ids=10200415297703686&fb_action_types=og.recommends&fb_source=aggregation&fb_aggregation_id=288381481237582#src=fb

Buddy the Dog released

Vincent T. Davis, San Antonio Express-News : January 16, 2014 : Updated: January 17, 2014 12:11am
Photo By Courtesy photo
1 of 2

Buddy is alleged to have bitten a girl in an unprovoked attack.

Buddy, the San Antonio dog who has become a cause celebre, has been released into the custody of his owners' veterinarian, city officials said.

The Labrador mix has been living on borrowed time ever since a judge ordered him euthanized in early November. Buddy is accused of injuring a 9-year-old girl. Animal Care Services had taken the case to municipal court, where Judge Daniel Guerrero heard evidence and ruled that the dog needed to be destroyed. But his 82-year-old owner, Homer Mojica, argued that the dog, who has no history of aggression, had been spooked by the little girl. He and he and his wife would do whatever they needed to keep the dog alive, including moving from the apartment complex. For their part, the attorney for the parents of the girl said they want to ensure that the dog doesn't injure anyone else.

Negotiations have been ongoing between Mojica's attorney Michelle Maloney and city officials all week in efforts to find a way to save the dog. Thousands have signed an online petition in support of the dog and several hundred people are expected at a rally Saturday at Alamo Plaza, with a "Free Buddy" theme. Organizers say the rally will continue as planned.

Go to ExpressNews.com for the full version of the story


Posted on January 17, 2014 by Advocates for San Antonio Pets (ASAP)
Buddy released into custody of his vet

BY VINCENT T. DAVIS STAFF WRITER
Picture

Buddy the Dog had been in an ACS kennel since early November, when Municipal Court Judge Daniel Guerrero ordered him euthanized.Courtesy photo

Buddy the Dog, who has become an international cause célèbre, is one step closer to freedom after he was released into the custody of his owners’ veterinarian Thursday afternoon.

Animal Care Services took the male Labrador mix to the unnamed veterinarian “to assure public safety, pending an appeal by the dog’s owner,” city officials said in a brief news release.

It was unclear late Thursday if Homer Mojica, Buddy’s 83-year-old owner, had seen his dog yet, and no other details were provided about the new custody arrangements. Phone calls to Mojica’s residence and attorney weren’t answered.

Buddy has been living on borrowed time in an ACS kennel since early November, when Municipal Court Judge Daniel Guerrero ordered him euthanized.

The dog is accused of injuring a 9-year-old girl during an encounter at a Northwest Side apartment complex where Mojica and the girl’s family live.

Negotiations between Mojica’s attorney Michelle Maloney and city officials have been continuing, as Maloney seeks to save Buddy’s life and the city seeks to address legal and public safety issues.

Each side has a different version of what happened.

Mojica said the dog had no history of aggression and the girl spooked him, causing him to scratch the child. The girl’s parents have said the dog bit their daughter, causing serious injury.

But the parents said Thursday evening they don’t blame the dog.

“It’s unfortunate that the dog had to go through this,” said the father, as the family spoke at length for the first time about the case. “We wish the dog’s owner would take responsibility and accountability for his actions.”

The father said that two weeks earlier, his wife and daughter had joined him at the complex, where he had moved for work. The mother said she and her daughter were about to get in their truck when the dog came up to them, his leash hanging from his collar, with Mojica following.

Mojica said he wanted to show them how the dog could “shake hands.” The mother said Mojica shook the dog’s paw and then turned to the girl.

“When he told the dog, ‘Shake her hand now,’ she moved her body slightly (and) the dog jumped and bit her,” her mother said.

Her husband added, “As far as the allegation that she provoked the dog, my daughter knows how to act around animals. We have two Labs.”

The father, who was not there when the incident occurred, said that when he entered the emergency room, the right side of his daughter’s face was covered in blood.

“I didn’t know if her eye was out of her socket,” he said, his voice breaking as he recalled that night.

The girl suffered a torn eye duct, a long gash on her cheek and a cut on the corner of her lip. She received 100 stitches to her cuts and had surgery to mend the tear duct, the parents said.

Thursday night, the child sat quietly, playing with a cell phone. When asked if she had anything to say, she said politely: “No, thank you.” Her injuries appeared to be healing but were still visible.

“It could’ve been worse,” the father said. “We’re very grateful she just sustained the injuries that she did. We just want to move on from here.”

Photos of the injuries were shown at the trial, where Guerrero ordered Buddy euthanized, sparking a firestorm of protests that have reached around the world, calling on authorities to “Free Buddy.” Even Mayor Julián Castro chimed in, saying an agreement could be reached that would allow Buddy to live.

Before Thursday’s decision to release the dog to the vet, supporters had planned a rally for noon Saturday at Alamo Plaza. Organizers say the rally will continue because Buddy’s fate has not been finalized.

Animal advocate Deanna Lee said they’re fighting to change how the city handles such cases as Buddy’s.

“Buddy is the symbol of injustice; he’s the catalyst, to say we’ve had enough,” she said. “This isn’t going to stop, we’ve got momentum going. We are trying to get the language of the state law changed, so it’s clear what the judge can and cannot do.”

In dog bite cases, a canine can be deemed dangerous, requiring a series of actions, including muzzling and keeping the animal in a kennel if it’s outside — but a “dangerous dog” is not necessarily euthanized. On the other hand, if the judge agrees that the case involves “severe bodily injury,” euthanasia can result.

There have been other cases where adults were injured and the case didn’t fall under the “severe bodily injury” category, but ACS officials said Buddy’s was pursued as such because it involved a child and the extent of the injuries.

“In this case, we certainly think it was a solid, very strong case for serious bodily injury and we took it to our prosecutors to file in court,” ACS director Kathy Davis said. “That’s what this law is all about, it’s protecting people in their neighborhood from a future event and making sure people, especially children, can walk through their neighborhood.”

Davis said in fiscal year 2013, ACS logged 4,571 bite cases. Out of those, three were filed as serious bodily injury and 20 as dangerous dogs.

During that same period, 91 dangerous dog affidavits were filed with ACS, resulting in investigations. Out of that total, 47 were deemed not dangerous. Fifteen cases were closed because at the time of the incident, the victim was in violation of a city code.

The director said ACS would rather work on proactively stopping cases from happening than cleaning them up after the fact.

“This is a tragedy where there are no winners,” Davis said. “The best we can hope for is that people watching the case will wake up, think about how they can protect their children and control their pets, so this isn’t duplicated in a social circle.” vtdavis@express-news.net

#savebuddy #freebuddythedog #sendbuddyhome

Posted on January 17, 2014 by Advocates for San Antonio Pets (ASAP)
http://tpr.org/post/buddy-dog-released-pending-appeal-euthanasia-order

Buddy The Dog Released Pending Appeal Of Euthanasia Order

Credit cc
Photo of buddy from the rally's Facebook page.

Animal-rights activists say public outcry has given a dog named Buddy another reprieve. But a local group is planning to work to bring about more awareness to state law that they say is too broad.

In a case that’s come to be known as "Buddy the Dog," the Golden Retriever’s owners are seeking a permanent resolution to keep him from being euthanized.

Municipal Court Judge Daniel Guerrero in December ordered that Buddy be put down after a November incident in which the dog was accused of attacking a little girl. The child reportedly needed 100 stitches and surgery to repair her eye. But the pet’s owners hold that Buddy was provoked and that the child’s injuries were not serious.

Local animal-rights advocate Vicki Jurney-Taylor organized a rally for Saturday morning to bring more attention what she said is a rubber stamp for euthanasia.

"We shall continue our campaign to make city leaders realize that it appears that every case that goes before Judge Guerrero results in a pet being euthanized," said spokeswoman Kathy Ames.

The City said in a statement Friday said that Animal Care Services is continuing to work with all parties to resolve the case. ACS officials told TPR that there were 4,571 dog bite cases logged in 2013, but only three rose to the level of serious bodily injury.

AS for Buddy's case, attorneys for his owners got an Exparte TRO -- a temporary restraining order -- that is keeping the dog alive until appeals run through the courts.

On Thursday, Animal Care Services released Buddy to his veterinarian, but the case isn’t over yet. The family is hoping for a permanent resolution with the city that will rescind the euthanasia order.

The Texas Health and Safety Code language specifies that even a provoked dog on a leash can be euthanized if the attack is severe.

Attorney Michelle Maloney, who represents the dog’s owners, is scheduled to speak at the event to raise awareness of the state law and to start a process to get the law changed.


Posted on January 17, 2014 by Advocates for San Antonio Pets (ASAP)
Buddy released into custody of his vet

BY VINCENT T. DAVIS STAFF WRITER
Picture

Buddy the Dog had been in an ACS kennel since early November, when Municipal Court Judge Daniel Guerrero ordered him euthanized.Courtesy photo

Buddy the Dog, who has become an international cause célèbre, is one step closer to freedom after he was released into the custody of his owners’ veterinarian Thursday afternoon.

Animal Care Services took the male Labrador mix to the unnamed veterinarian “to assure public safety, pending an appeal by the dog’s owner,” city officials said in a brief news release.

It was unclear late Thursday if Homer Mojica, Buddy’s 83-year-old owner, had seen his dog yet, and no other details were provided about the new custody arrangements. Phone calls to Mojica’s residence and attorney weren’t answered.

Buddy has been living on borrowed time in an ACS kennel since early November, when Municipal Court Judge Daniel Guerrero ordered him euthanized.

The dog is accused of injuring a 9-year-old girl during an encounter at a Northwest Side apartment complex where Mojica and the girl’s family live.

Negotiations between Mojica’s attorney Michelle Maloney and city officials have been continuing, as Maloney seeks to save Buddy’s life and the city seeks to address legal and public safety issues.

Each side has a different version of what happened.

Mojica said the dog had no history of aggression and the girl spooked him, causing him to scratch the child. The girl’s parents have said the dog bit their daughter, causing serious injury.

But the parents said Thursday evening they don’t blame the dog.

“It’s unfortunate that the dog had to go through this,” said the father, as the family spoke at length for the first time about the case. “We wish the dog’s owner would take responsibility and accountability for his actions.”

The father said that two weeks earlier, his wife and daughter had joined him at the complex, where he had moved for work. The mother said she and her daughter were about to get in their truck when the dog came up to them, his leash hanging from his collar, with Mojica following.

Mojica said he wanted to show them how the dog could “shake hands.” The mother said Mojica shook the dog’s paw and then turned to the girl.

“When he told the dog, ‘Shake her hand now,’ she moved her body slightly (and) the dog jumped and bit her,” her mother said.

Her husband added, “As far as the allegation that she provoked the dog, my daughter knows how to act around animals. We have two Labs.”

The father, who was not there when the incident occurred, said that when he entered the emergency room, the right side of his daughter’s face was covered in blood.

“I didn’t know if her eye was out of her socket,” he said, his voice breaking as he recalled that night.

The girl suffered a torn eye duct, a long gash on her cheek and a cut on the corner of her lip. She received 100 stitches to her cuts and had surgery to mend the tear duct, the parents said.

Thursday night, the child sat quietly, playing with a cell phone. When asked if she had anything to say, she said politely: “No, thank you.” Her injuries appeared to be healing but were still visible.

“It could’ve been worse,” the father said. “We’re very grateful she just sustained the injuries that she did. We just want to move on from here.”

Photos of the injuries were shown at the trial, where Guerrero ordered Buddy euthanized, sparking a firestorm of protests that have reached around the world, calling on authorities to “Free Buddy.” Even Mayor Julián Castro chimed in, saying an agreement could be reached that would allow Buddy to live.

Before Thursday’s decision to release the dog to the vet, supporters had planned a rally for noon Saturday at Alamo Plaza. Organizers say the rally will continue because Buddy’s fate has not been finalized.

Animal advocate Deanna Lee said they’re fighting to change how the city handles such cases as Buddy’s.

“Buddy is the symbol of injustice; he’s the catalyst, to say we’ve had enough,” she said. “This isn’t going to stop, we’ve got momentum going. We are trying to get the language of the state law changed, so it’s clear what the judge can and cannot do.”

In dog bite cases, a canine can be deemed dangerous, requiring a series of actions, including muzzling and keeping the animal in a kennel if it’s outside — but a “dangerous dog” is not necessarily euthanized. On the other hand, if the judge agrees that the case involves “severe bodily injury,” euthanasia can result.

There have been other cases where adults were injured and the case didn’t fall under the “severe bodily injury” category, but ACS officials said Buddy’s was pursued as such because it involved a child and the extent of the injuries.

“In this case, we certainly think it was a solid, very strong case for serious bodily injury and we took it to our prosecutors to file in court,” ACS director Kathy Davis said. “That’s what this law is all about, it’s protecting people in their neighborhood from a future event and making sure people, especially children, can walk through their neighborhood.”

Davis said in fiscal year 2013, ACS logged 4,571 bite cases. Out of those, three were filed as serious bodily injury and 20 as dangerous dogs.

During that same period, 91 dangerous dog affidavits were filed with ACS, resulting in investigations. Out of that total, 47 were deemed not dangerous. Fifteen cases were closed because at the time of the incident, the victim was in violation of a city code.

The director said ACS would rather work on proactively stopping cases from happening than cleaning them up after the fact.

“This is a tragedy where there are no winners,” Davis said. “The best we can hope for is that people watching the case will wake up, think about how they can protect their children and control their pets, so this isn’t duplicated in a social circle.” vtdavis@express-news.net
1

Posted on January 15, 2014 by Advocates for San Antonio Pets (ASAP)
Marilyn Knapp Litt's article in the Examiner.com
http://www.examiner.com/article/san-antonio-mayor-makes-statement-about-the-fate-of-buddy-the-dog

San Antonio Mayor makes statement about the fate of Buddy the dog

KENS5
January 15, 2014

The family of Buddy, a Golden Retriever mix, has been fighting for his life against the city of San Antonio since Buddy was detained November 1st for injuring a girl. The case is creating ill will with local animal rescuers, who are planning a protest in Alamo Plaza on January 18, and is a continuing source of bad publicity for the city of San Antonio. Last night, January 14, Mayor Julian Castro commented on the high profile case:

"It's important of course that there are consequences for the fact that a little girl got harmed. However, I'm confident that something can be worked out short of euthanizing the dog," said Mayor Castro. "I'm confident that another agreement can be reached so that the dog can live, and we'll go ahead and take a look at the way that these cases are handled in the future."

Buddy's family wants to spare Buddy, but they may not want an agreement with the onerous restrictions of a "dangerous dog" designation. The family says Buddy scratched the victim because he was startled when she screamed in his face. If Buddy is allowed to live, but is designated dangerous, his owners will have to carry $100,000 in insurance each year, muzzle Buddy when he is outside, and comply with other measures meant to protect the public. (statute)

There are questions about how and why the city is prosecuting this case. One local news station believes there is a double standard pertaining to who gets the full court press and who does not; because Animal Care Services was told not to comment on the case of an actor's dogs who escaped his yard and attacked a dog on leash.

Animal Care Services has commented on this case. The Director of Animal Care Services has characterized the injuries as quite severe (see Emergency Room photo above), although nothing this detailed has been submitted to the court:

"The 9 year old girl suffered a crushed tear duct, a large/long gash that laid open her cheek that started just below her eye and extended to her lip. The corner of her lip was also lacerated/torn and had to be sewn back on. In all, her injuries required over 100 stitches to her face. She was hospitalized and had to undergo surgery to repair the tear duct. There is still a drain in her tear duct and she may require additional surgery. According to her parents, she also has emotional issues to deal with following this incident."

The only medical evidence introduced in Buddy's case is the Emergency Room photograph at the top of this article and the testimony of an Animal Control Officer. Court watchers, particularly Gilbert Garcia who has followed this case closely, are puzzled that more medical records were not offered in evidence as well as testimony by a medical professional.

A photograph taken in court two weeks later would seem to show no evidence of any physical injuries or stitches having been recently removed.

Animal lovers, Buddy's family and friends, as well as Buddy, are currently waiting to hear the results of his appeal.


Posted on January 15, 2014 by Advocates for San Antonio Pets (ASAP)
http://www.ksat.com/news/Buddy-the-dog-s-future-still-uncertain/-/478452/23934224/-/2veomo/-/index.html

Buddy the dog's future remains uncertain

Published On: Jan 14 2014 10:29:55 PM CST   Updated On: Jan 14 2014 10:29:00 PM CST

We've been following the case of a dog sentenced to death and apparently so has the mayor. While the future of Buddy the dog is still uncertain, it looks like the mission to keep him alive is ongoing.

========================

http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local/article/Activists-rally-behind-Buddy-the-Dog-5144649.php

Activists rally behind Buddy the Dog

By Kolten Parker : January 15, 2014 : Updated: January 15, 2014 6:59am
Photo By Courtesy/courtesy
1 of 2
Buddy, a 6-year-old golden retriever mix, was granted a temporary reprieve Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2013, after a judge ordered that he be euthanized after he attacked a 9-year-old girl. The dog's 83-year-old owner and a witness said the dog attacked after the girl screamed in his face, but the girl's mother testified the attack was unprovoked. Here, Buddy relaxes at home during happier times. He has been in quarantine in an ACS kennel since early November.

SAN ANTONIO — A local animal advocate planning a protest Saturday says she's willing to be arrested to bring attention to the incarceration of Buddy the Dog and separation from his 83-year-old owner.

Buddy, whose life remains in a legal limbo after reportedly biting a 9-year-old girl last year, has been quarantined by the city since November.

The Alamo Plaza protest, set for noon Saturday, is organized by Vicki Lynn Jurney-Taylor. It has gained about 200 registered guests on Facebook.

“Trust me, we WILL make the National news once I am arrested in my wheelchair over this travesty of Justice!,” Taylor wrote on the event page.

City attorneys have pushed since December to have Buddy immediately put down, but reached an agreement with the attorneys for Buddy's owner Homer Mejica Friday to not euthanize him while other appeals are sorted out.

Public outcry including an online petition and calls to public officials erupted as Buddy and his owner's case made news.

As the Express-News' Gilbert Garcia reported last week, “Buddy has become a symbol for animal lovers, who often suggest ACS is more obsessed with posting impressive statistics than protecting animals.

Thousands of euthanizations still take place every year, hundreds of thousands of strays roam the streets and dog bites are on the rise, ACS figures show.

In 2012, 13,560 dogs were put to death, ACS figures show, down from 19,646 in 2011.”

 

kparker@express-news.net

 

Twitter: @KoltenParker

 

 

 

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