Raise the Roof

For: Canines for Service Inc.
Organizer: Canines for Service Inc.
$2,045
of $60,000 goal.
Raised by 27 donors
3% Complete
This fundraiser is closed. Thank you for your support!

The Story

Our Raise the Roof Campaign is not about bricks and mortar. It is about reaching more people. It is about providing more service dogs to more people in need. It is about offering our Veterans career training and employment opportunities. YOU can make a difference with a donation of ANY amount. Please help us do more today.

CFS has steadily grown and expanded over the years providing more services within the same walls. Now, to take it to the next level we need to move into bigger space. Why do we need more space? With a bigger facility we can begin a service dog training school, teach others how to train highly skilled service dogs while saving more shelter dogs, serving more people faster to give them greater independence. The space we need is about 8,000 sq ft of office and warehouse; at least 6,000 sq ft of warehouse for the kennels, training area and the support services (like feed room and grooming room). New space will create an opportunity for people to learn new job skills, which is much needed in the community, and serve people with disabilities quicker. We will also have new volunteer opportunities to engage more volunteers in our mission. Your support would help us move into a larger facility in a long term lease. Let's expand the walls because together we can make a difference.

Our goal of $60,000 will provide for 12-months of rent plus utilities in our new space.

Fundraiser Updates

Posted on September 19, 2013

Posted on September 19, 2013

It is an exciting time around Canines for Service when a person is partnered with their 
service dog.  Team training, when the person learns to work with the service dog selected form them, is very intense.  No matter how much we try to prepare the person receiving the dog, their family, our volunteers and staff, it is an emotional and physically exhausting time. 

How does it all start? It starts with the commitment of a volunteer to open their hearts and home to raise and train a puppy.  The volunteer, becomes afoster family, and the staff at Canines for Service is then charged with finding a 7-11 week old puppy.   Most often our puppies come from local shelters or rescues but there are times when a puppy is donated by someone whose dog had a litter.  

What does it take to be a Foster?Our foster families are individuals, couples, traditional or non-traditional families that have a willingness and desire to help someone else. The foster comes to regular classes that are held at our facility to train the puppy under our direction and guidance.  Fostering a service dog in training is a gift of patience and love.  The foster also makes a financial commitment for the costs of food and veterinary care for the pup.  The foster will have the puppy with them for at least one full year, sometimes longer, before the pup transfers to another trainer. 

What happens when the pup goes to another trainer?When the pup transfers up to another trainer it will begin training in intermediate and advanced skills.  The foundation skills the foster family worked on with the pup and the socialization are key to preparing a well rounded service dog.   When the dog is nearing completion of training, an assessment is done to determine readiness for placement and the category of service work the dog is best suited for. 

How is the client matched with the dog?Applications are received from people needing a service dog and a careful review is done to ensure the person's needs can be met with a service dog from Canines for Service.  If we can meet the persons needs, they are placed on a wait list.  As a dog is nearing completion of training we start to look at the dog for its size and skills and review our approved applicants to make a match.    Once a match is made team training is arranged.  

What happens during team training?During team training the client is brought into the community to spend 5 to 7 days to learn how to work with the service dog matched to them.  It is an intense week of training for the person to learn the dogs skills, how to command and control the dog and how to use the dog to help them with their disability.  Team training is also a chance for the donor of the pup and foster to meet the client, if possible, the trainer to say good-bye and the team to celebrate the new beginning. 

We need You to be a part of this special gift of independence on four paws. Donate, foster and volunteer to help us serve others.


Posted on September 19, 2013

Posted on September 19, 2013

It is an exciting time around Canines for Service when a person is partnered with their 
service dog.  Team training, when the person learns to work with the service dog selected form them, is very intense.  No matter how much we try to prepare the person receiving the dog, their family, our volunteers and staff, it is an emotional and physically exhausting time. 

How does it all start? It starts with the commitment of a volunteer to open their hearts and home to raise and train a puppy.  The volunteer, becomes afoster family, and the staff at Canines for Service is then charged with finding a 7-11 week old puppy.   Most often our puppies come from local shelters or rescues but there are times when a puppy is donated by someone whose dog had a litter.  

What does it take to be a Foster?Our foster families are individuals, couples, traditional or non-traditional families that have a willingness and desire to help someone else. The foster comes to regular classes that are held at our facility to train the puppy under our direction and guidance.  Fostering a service dog in training is a gift of patience and love.  The foster also makes a financial commitment for the costs of food and veterinary care for the pup.  The foster will have the puppy with them for at least one full year, sometimes longer, before the pup transfers to another trainer. 

What happens when the pup goes to another trainer?When the pup transfers up to another trainer it will begin training in intermediate and advanced skills.  The foundation skills the foster family worked on with the pup and the socialization are key to preparing a well rounded service dog.   When the dog is nearing completion of training, an assessment is done to determine readiness for placement and the category of service work the dog is best suited for. 

How is the client matched with the dog?Applications are received from people needing a service dog and a careful review is done to ensure the person's needs can be met with a service dog from Canines for Service.  If we can meet the persons needs, they are placed on a wait list.  As a dog is nearing completion of training we start to look at the dog for its size and skills and review our approved applicants to make a match.    Once a match is made team training is arranged.  

What happens during team training?During team training the client is brought into the community to spend 5 to 7 days to learn how to work with the service dog matched to them.  It is an intense week of training for the person to learn the dogs skills, how to command and control the dog and how to use the dog to help them with their disability.  Team training is also a chance for the donor of the pup and foster to meet the client, if possible, the trainer to say good-bye and the team to celebrate the new beginning. 

We need You to be a part of this special gift of independence on four paws. Donate, foster and volunteer to help us serve others.


Posted on September 3, 2013

Posted on September 3, 2013

Thank you to those who have already stepped up to support our need for larger space.    Recently Gunner's Mate Chief Jeannette Tarqueno, a wounded Naval service member officially received Service Dog Gaza on August 26 after a week of team training. She hopes Gaza will be able to provide more independence and comfort in her life.  Tarqueno has served a distinguished career in the Navy for more than 11 years including service in Yokosuka, Japan at Joint Base Pearl Harbor - Hickam, HI onboard the USS Port Royal.
Jeannette was struck on the left side of her head by a 30-pound armored plate bracket that was falling from the deck above.Despite the limitations of her injury, Jeannette sets the example of overcoming ones obstacles to continue to live even with the changes she has faced.After the injury, she took and passed her chief exams, as well as competed in the 2012 and 2013 Wounded Warrior games as a key member of the Navy cycling team.Tarqueno said, "As service members, it is sometimes difficult to put aside our pride and ask for help."

Jeannette reached out to Canines for Veterans with the help of Safe Harbor and her case manager. After completing an extensive application, which included a video and documentation that she was no longer deployable, she was approved for a service dog and matched with Gaza to help her overcome her limitations and achieve her goal of completing a distinguished Navy career."The application process asks for a lot of information and the video was most challenging”, says Jeannette.  “but many groups require a service member to travel at their own expense for a face-to-face interview.  Canines for Veterans has found a way to make the application process work without the expense or loss of time to the Veteran.”

Service Dog Gaza will accompany Jeannette and assist her with her balance issues, PTSD and issues related to her traumatic brain injury at her new post in Rock Hill, IL.  "It's a wonderful program. I couldn't be more blessed to have such an incredible companion," said Tarqueno.

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